Garden Roses and Ribbons

Whenever my garden roses produce long stem, it is cause for celebration for that can only mean one thing, they are ready to be used as cut flowers in my homegrown flower arrangements or bouquets. Although these stunning rose flowers off of the Schloss Eutin rose bred by Kordes, are a little bit too far gone and I was set to only enjoy them in the garden, it looked as if a storm was brewing and should the roses be shattered in rain or hail, it would have been a shame to let them go to waste. Whenever I cut flowers from the garden, especially roses, I look for stems that have one flower open and the rest in a looser bud form, that is the stage at which I take the rose pruners and snip off the stems. Depending on the variety and time of day the roses were cut, they have a vase life of up to 5 days.

Interesting fact is, that the more a rose is scented the shorter the vase life. That is the reason behind why most rose bouquets from the florist will lack scent, for they are made

Garden Roses and Ribbons so delicate

Garden Roses and Ribbons- the rose is Schloss Eutin

Garden Roses and Crochet Ribbons

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Mulched Flower Bed Gone Wild

The mulched rose bed has gone wild. It really is no wonder as I slacked off a little tiny bit in the weeding department. A couple of months have passed since the rose bed awoke into blooming weather and it was a pleasant surprise to find out that the majority of the weeds are made up of very interesting local blue plants coming from tiny little bulbs and huge clumps of weeds blooming with hundreds of small yellow flowers- weeds that deserve to stay in my opinion. We even have sunflowers growing in the rose bed because we fed the birds with them in the winter and some seeds must have found their way into the fertile soil. The mulch has been a lifesaver during the dry spells as it sponges up a lot of water and slowly releases it during the heatwaves. Even when it looks like the top layer of mulch is completely dry, you only have to dig down an inch or two to uncover moist black soil in which the plants thrive.

princess alexandra of kent rose bud

princess alexandra of kent rose- David Austin

baronesse rose (2)

mulched rosebed

mulched flower bed

geoff hamilton rose- David Austin

baronesse rose

baronesse rose flower blooming

baronesse rose blooming

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Sprintime Garden

There really is something magical about watching your garden come to life. All the bare canes and patches of ground that were only covered in snow during the winter slowly become the birthplace to tiny little shoots making their way out of the ground and towards the sun. It’s like witnessing a miracle over and over each year. Pretty neat, if you ask me.

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Having fresh flowers from the garden to use in floral arrangements is perhaps the main reason behind why I garden and grow roses. Whenever my garden roses produce long stem, it is cause for celebration for that can only mean one thing, they are ready to be used as cut flowers in my homegrown floral arrangements or bouquets.  For these special occasions, or when I want to play florist and gift the flower arrangements from the garden to friends and family, it is nice to have a collection of crochet ribbons on hand.

Garden Roses and Ribbons so delicate

Garden Roses and Ribbons- the rose is Schloss Eutin

Although these stunning rose flowers cut off of the Schloss Eutin rose (bred by Kordes) are a little bit too far gone and I was ready enjoy them in the garden, it looked as if a storm was brewing and should the roses be shattered in rain or hail, it would have been a shame to let them go to waste. Whenever I cut flowers from the garden, especially roses, I look for stems that have one flower open and the rest in a looser bud form, that is the stage at which I take the rose pruners and snip off the stems. Depending on the variety and time of day the roses were cut, they have a vase life of up to 5 days.

Interesting fact- the more scent a rose has, the shorter the vase life. That is the reason behind why most rose bouquets from the florist will lack scent, for they are made  primarily to last and be enjoyed with the eyes, not the nose. The fact that one can enjoy a rose bouquet fresh from the garden without any worry about bringing in all kinds of chemicals into the home and enjoy the sweet perfume as well as the beauty is as good as it gets.

Garden Roses and Crochet Ribbons

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It would be difficult to find a better red climbing rose than Florentina from the German rose breeding center Kordes, which claims to have the prettiest roses in the world. The red nostalgic cupped blooms off of this incredible garden rose, as well as its disease resistance and vigorous growth make it a winner in my book. For one, as I already mentioned, the blooms were red and supposedly she would grow to be an impressive rose easily reaching a height of 2 meters. To this day I am guilty of choosing roses in all shades of apricot and pink, but red…. that is a whole other story, therefore she got the best possible spot available on a back corner of the house. A place we never had much reason to go to, but there was a new terrace being build off the living room, so I thought it would be a fitting home for the new flower arrival. Right away the rose took off.

Florentina rose

Kordes Florentina climbing rose

For the first year, the rose resembled a really healthy bush, with lots of showy glossy green foliage and although there were noticeable signs suggesting that she wanted to climb, she did not have much support. Under the weight of the heavy clusters of blooms, the branches went from vertical to horizontal and she rewarded us all with even more blooms. This year, she has gotten a lot of support (still not enough) and is starting to be trained to be a little wall off of the terrace, a lot of energy must have gone into growing so much larger, as there have been noticeably fewer flower stems in the first flush. To give her credit though, she is a fantastic repeater for a climbing rose and I have no doubt that there still will be plenty more blooms to enjoy later in the season.

Kordes Florentina rose

The blooms themselves are absolutely gorgeous nostalgic cupped roses, that transform into a flat form as time goes on.  The double arrangement of petals looks so delicate despite each bloom being roughly around 10 cm in diameter. After reading many forums and articles, many claim that the rose has no scent. After all, Kordes is known to breed roses for disease resistance and not scent, a little bit of a different approach compared with other popular rose breeders, yet I can confidently say that my Florentina rose has a scent, albeit one that is as inoffensive as it gets. For sure it is not a rose whose scent will travel far, but if you were to snip off the flowers to go into a bouquet there certainly would be a scent once you’d bury your nose into the sea of red petals. The blooms do surprisingly well in the sun as well as rain and do not shatter right away.  In fact, the first flush is still going strong and has been blooming for at least 2 weeks now.

Kordes Florentina rose- stunning climbing rose, worth having in the garden

Kordes Florentina rose- cut flowers
Kordes climbing rose Florentina

The one thing I will say about this rose, is choose its permanent planting spot wisely as it is as beautiful as it gets and you truly would have trouble finding a rose as disease resistant or vigorous as Florentina, but the canes  on it are so incredibly thorny. Choose carefully for you will think twice about pruning it back or replanting once you realize that its armor of thorns goes almost all the way up to the blooms. Even snipping off these three stems photographed in the basket was brutal. All in all, it has completely changed my relationship with red roses and although it will be huge in a year or two, it has earned a permanent spot in the garden. Do you have any gardener bias towards certain plants or colors? Let me know, I’d love to hear about your gardening style. Have a great day!

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I never really thought that my little rose garden patch would turn into my rose cutting garden, but as the garden rose bushes took off this season and are looking slightly crowded, it has been a joy taking the garden scissors and snipping off the blooms. The thing about nature is if you take just enough it rewards you again with plenty very soon. David Austin roses have a special place in my heart, for there is nothing better than having beautiful scented garden roses to cut flowers off of. They are probably my favorite to use as cut flowers in flower arrangements, but unfortunately they have a rather shorter vase life, which they make up for in beauty and their wonderful perfume. Although the main blooming flush is over, the roses have been covered in buds the whole time and look absolutely lovely. They have grown so well, that it would be easy to mistake many for well established roses that have time to their advantage, when in fact this is their blooming second season. I might put together a rose profile for every single rose I own, for everyone interested.

David Austin Rose

Climbing Polka, Darcey Brussell, Sweet Juliet Roses

Butterfly bush

This gorgeous purple butterfly bush started off as a puny little thing, perhaps 45 cm tall, now it towers over my head attracting butterflies with its sweet scent. There are many lovely plants in the garden to combine with the roses in bouquets and without a doubt my favorite would have to be hydrangeas. The combination has really cemented my love for perennials and now it has all become about planting as many as possible. Perhaps what I love most about the garden is its lack of formality, in every flower bed you can find a fruit bush or a tomato plant or two, diversity is what gives it its charm. But, if you’ve seen my post Mulched Bed Gone Wild, you already know that I really do not stress about removing all ”weeds” as I feel I’d be doing the rose bed a disservice it the dry spells.

Climbing Polka rose

garden cat

Mini Eden Rose

Mini Eden Rose- beautiful rose

I hope all flower lovers out there have a great day!

Picture descriptions: 1.&2. Darcey Brussell rose and Sweet Juliet rose- both bred by David Austin 3. Purple Butterfly bush 4.Climbing Polka rose- vigorous and so fantastic as a cut flower too 5. My loyal garden helper who almost never leaves my side and steals cuddles while I do weeding 6.&7. Mini Eden rose
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The wood chip mulched rose bed has gone wild. It is almost hard to believe that it is the very same rose bed, that was installed only a little over a year ago, as seen in my post Planting Bare Root David Austin and Old Roses. The rose bed is home to more than 10 rose bushes, most of them are David Austin roses, and is rather huge, so there really is no wonder as to how overgrown it has gotten since I slacked off a little tiny bit in the weeding department. A couple of months have passed since the garden awoke into blooming weather and it was a pleasant surprise to find out that the majority of the weeds in the flower bed are made up of very interesting local blue plants coming from tiny little bulbs, huge clumps of weeds blooming with hundreds of small yellow flowers and woodland strawberries- weeds that deserve to stay in my opinion. We even have sunflowers growing in the rose bed because we fed the birds with them in the winter and some seeds must have found their way into the fertile soil.

The wood chip mulch has been a lifesaver during the dry spells as it sponges up a lot of water and slowly releases it during the heatwaves and has played such a huge role in setting up a water conserving garden. We have very heavy clay soil, which dries rock-hard during the summer and has lot of run off water, if it weren’t for the mulch, we’d be out in the garden watering at least an hour every evening. With a little bit of smart garden planning, we have slowly begun to transform our rural landscape into a paradise. We started off with soil amendments and the mulch that has slowly turned our previously heavy clay into beautiful black gold of a soil in the matter of a year.  Since the garden is very large, we have been “spot wood chip mulching” and adding generous helpings of manure and compost to any place we plan to garden in the futere. All our trees, bushes and flower beds have a layer of wood chip mulch and even when it looks like the top layer of mulch is completely dry, you only have to dig down an inch or two to uncover moist black soil in which the plants thrive. Going the wood chip mulch route was probably the best garden planning we could have done so far, although we were hesitant as to how it would work in a rose garden setting.

princess alexandra of kent rose bud

Princess Alexandra of Kent rose, an amazing shrub rose with striking huge fragrant blooms of the prettiest shade of pink, bred by David Austin

princess alexandra of kent rose- David Austin

Princess Alexandra of Kent ros bred by David Austin

Even the puny David Austin rose bushes from last year, which I was ready to count as losses and hardly thought them good enough for composting, came in full force and have even started pushing up completely new canes from the ground. If I am impressed with them this year, then I cannot wait to see them next year as I am sure they will be absolutely gorgeous and lush. Speaking of lush growth, we have a caterpillar problem, for the past couple of springs they have chewed off half the leaves from the fruit trees, even the walnut trees were not spared and to my dismay they also find roses tasty. Some bushes are much more affected than others, but it is a problem in this no-spray garden of mine. Any tips on what I could do?

baronesse rose (2)

Baronesse Rose- a perfect garden rose as the shrub is always covered with buds and flowers

mulched rosebed

mulched flower bed

geoff hamilton rose- David Austin

baronesse rose

baronesse rose flower blooming

baronesse rose blooming

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There really is something magical about watching your garden come to life. All the bare canes and patches of ground that were covered only in snow during the winter,slowly become the birthplace to tiny little shoots making their way out of the ground towards the sun. It’s like witnessing a miracle over and over each year. Pretty neat, if you ask me.

spring tulip bed
spring garden

gladiola bed

Hellebore flower with seed pod- a trusty garden favorite

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